UNGOVERN(A)BLE

San Francisco-native. Proud to be a problem.
lastuli:

West Beirut, Lebanon, 1984. Photo by George Azar.

George Azar’s poignant shot of Jawkal, a young teenager, who is sitting alone, despondent after having lost his family to an Israeli bombing in southern Lebanon, not knowing, of course, that soon afterwards he will lose his own eyesight in another attack. (x)

More details about this photograph and others by George Azar in the documentary Beirut Photographer.

lastuli:

West Beirut, Lebanon, 1984. Photo by George Azar.

George Azar’s poignant shot of Jawkal, a young teenager, who is sitting alone, despondent after having lost his family to an Israeli bombing in southern Lebanon, not knowing, of course, that soon afterwards he will lose his own eyesight in another attack. (x)

More details about this photograph and others by George Azar in the documentary Beirut Photographer.

(via thepeoplewillnotstaysilent)

American pacifism will be left to “feel good about itself” as the revolution goes on without it.

—Ward Churchill, Pacifism as Pathology (via rakaizombie)

(via bespookytogether)

beautone:

Advertisement by the U.S. Department of the Interior offering surplus Indian lands for sale (1910-1911)

beautone:

Advertisement by the U.S. Department of the Interior offering surplus Indian lands for sale (1910-1911)

(via anarcho-queer)

elrastrodetusangreenlanieve:

Let’s talk about Prudencia Ayala.

Prudencia Ayala was a woman born in 1885 to a native family in a small town in El Salvador, Central America.

She started going to school at age 10, but had to left her studies because her family was too poor to sustain her, so she became a seamstress. She was an autodidact, and taught herself to read politics and economics, until she developed an opinion. Since 1913 she began publishing articles on feminism and anti-imperialism. She was opposed the dictatorships in Latin America, the North American interventions, and proclaimed the necessity of Central America to join into a federal Republic. 

She tried to be a presidential candidate in 1930, even though women couldn’t vote in El Salvador by then. Her government plan included many feminist points, a law to support syndicates, and the legal recognition of illegitimate children. She entered an intellectual and legal fight to be allowed to be a candidate but the Supreme Court resolved against her.

Prudencia retired from politics after that, and until her death, six years later, she worked closely with workers groups and social movements.

Women couldn’t vote in El Salvador until 1950.

Sorry, I couldn’t provide a source in English, but you can read a bit more about here in Spanish here: http://museo.com.sv/2010/11/biografia-prudencia-ayala-la-hija-de-la-centella/ 

(via reclaimingthelatinatag)